Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 491

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write an anecdote poem.
Author:
Publish date:

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write an anecdote poem.

Image placeholder title

For today’s prompt, write an anecdote poem. An anecdote is a short, often interesting, story about a real incident or person. Like I might write a poem about something someone said or did at the post office when I went to buy stamps, or maybe something amusing happened at the grocery store.

*****

Recreate Your Poetry!

Image placeholder title

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore—something that has to be done after the joy of the first draft. In fact, revision should be viewed as an enjoyable extension of the creation process—something that you want to experience after the joy of the first draft.

Learn the three rules of revision, seven revision filters, common excuses for avoiding revision (and how to overcome them), and more in this power-packed poetry revision tutorial.

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at an Anecdote Poem:

“I Once Nearly Killed Bill”

Of course, this all happened
before the Kill Bill movies,
but my friends and I were piled
into the old minivan together,
and I was driving as usual
and feeling a bit distracted
by all the chatter as we looked
for a good parking spot outside
the Columbus comic convention
when it happened: someone
shouted, "stop," and I slammed
the brakes to just barely not hit
Mr. Kung Fu David Carradine,
who slowly raised his eyes
to meet mine and gave me
a death stare unlike any
I've ever received and without
a word walked onward
to whatever he had to do that day

Of course, not long after, he was
in all the Kill Bill movies,
and I thought about the irony
that I'd nearly killed (or
at least badly injured) Bill
before they could be made,
and it was something I'd think
from time to time, and I was
glad he was alive and that
I had a spotless driving record,
and that was all good
until he actually did die,
and they thought it was
suicide at first, but then realized
it was accidental asphyxiation
related to self-bondage,
and then, I've since wondered
which death "the barefoot legend"
would've preferred:

being found hung in a hotel closet
while trying to perform
autoerotic asphyxiation on himself
or getting hit in a parking lot
in Columbus, Ohio, by a minivan
full of distracted fanboys.

2020_creative_gifts_for_writers

2020 Creative Gift Ideas for Writers

Searching for something special for that special someone who loves to write? Check out our 2020 creative gift ideas for writers with a range of fun gifts for the wordsmiths in your life.

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 28

For the 2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets write a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write a remix poem.

Omeara_11:27

Going Viral: Writing From the Hopeful Heart

Author Kitty O'Meara shares her experience of going viral online and how that lead to some exciting publishing opportunities.

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 27

For the 2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets write a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write a what's next poem.

plot_twist_story_prompts_an_invitation_robert_lee_brewer

Plot Twist Story Prompts: An Invitation

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, give a character an invitation.

Vintage WD_Conder Soule 11:26

Vintage WD: Poetry without Rhyme—Or Even Thees and Thous

In this article from 1977, children’s writer and poet Jean Conder Soule explores the question, “How will I know when I’ve written a poem?”

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 26

For the 2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets write a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write a thankful poem.

Richard_11:24

Building Better Worlds: Five Tips to Guide Your Planning Process

Writer and WD editor Moriah Richard shares her top advice to help you fight world-building overwhelm and organize your story.

March_11:25

Why I Write Mysteries

Mystery writer Nev March shares how she found herself writing historical mysteries and what she hopes readers will get from her storytelling.