Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 490

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a comics character poem.
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Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a comics character poem.

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For today’s prompt, pick a comics character, make that character the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Comics characters include all your typical super heroes and heroines, like Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, and Captain Marvel. It also includes all those villains, like the Joker, Green Goblin, Magneto, and Catwoman. However, don't forget those newspaper comic characters, such as Charlie Brown, Peppermint Patty, Garfield, and Little Lulu.

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Recreate Your Poetry!

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Revision doesn’t have to be a chore—something that has to be done after the joy of the first draft. In fact, revision should be viewed as an enjoyable extension of the creation process—something that you want to experience after the joy of the first draft.

Learn the three rules of revision, seven revision filters, common excuses for avoiding revision (and how to overcome them), and more in this power-packed poetry revision tutorial.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Comics Character Poem:

“Firestorm”

Part high school student and part Nobel
Prize-winning physicist, the real reason
I fell for Firestorm was because he had
a cool name and costume. And his head
was literally on fire. I mean, sure, he could
fly, and two heads are better than one,
and all that, but his head was on fire.

I was always a DC fanboy, prefering
Batman and the Flash to the X-Men
and Avengers, though everybody likes
Spider-Man. Still, there was something
magical about being two people at once
and being called the Nuclear Man. And
honestly, his head was literally on fire.

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