Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 476

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For today’s prompt, write a spring poem. Believe it or not, today is the first day of spring (and my little brother's birthday!). So write about birds and bees. Or break lines over the lack of spring-like attributes in your neck of the woods. Maybe you still have snow, a lack of flowers, and/or the birds have not yet returned. Or take poetic license and write a poem about springy hair, mechanical springs, or natural springs. Spring to it!

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Poem Your Days Away!

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Online poetry prompts are great! But where can you get your poem fix when you unplug? The answer is the forthcoming Smash Poetry Journal, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This book collects 125 poetry prompts from the Poetic Asides blog, gives poets plenty of room to write poems, and a lot of other great poetic information. Perfectly sized to carry in a backpack or purse, you can jot down ideas for poems as you’re waiting in line for a morning coffee or take it to the park for a breezy afternoon writing session (or on a bus, at a laundromat, or about anywhere else you can imagine–except under water, unless you’re in a submarine or a giant breathable plastic bubble).

Anyway, it’s great for prompting poems, and you should order a copy today. (Maybe order an extra one as a gift for a friend.)

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Spring Poem:

“the bird & the bee”

The bird asked the bee,
"Is it okay to fly?"

"Why did you ask me?
Why not ask the fly?"

The bird sang sweetly,
"I ate the fool fly."

Then, he ate the bee,
whose sting made him cry.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). His favorite season is autumn, but spring is pretty cool too. Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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