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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 469

For today’s prompt, write an encounter poem. The encounter could be a scheduled appointment. Or an unexpected meeting. The encounter itself could be a happy event. Or produce sad, anxious, scary, or annoying emotions. Could be person-to-person. Or person-to-animal, animal-to-animal, or even robot-to-alien (because, why not?).

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Build an Audience for Your Poetry!

Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial

Learn how to find more readers for your poetry with the Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial! In this 60-minute tutorial, poets will learn how to connect with more readers online, in person, and via publication.

Poets will learn the basic definition of a platform (and why it’s important), tools for cultivating a readership, how to define goals and set priorities, how to find readers without distracting from your writing, and more!

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at an Encounter Poem:

“No Cavities”

With her perfect teeth,
she invited me
to claim the only seat

before she partook
of her metal hook
and scraped at every nook

while questioning me
on how I brush teeth
as I sank in my seat.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He appreciates dentists, but he never looks forward to encountering them (or their tiny metal hooks). Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 587

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write an On Blank poem.

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the fisherman

The Fisherman

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A Few Tips for Writing Personal Essays

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Dispel vs. Expel (Grammar Rules)

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