Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 454

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For today’s prompt, take the phrase "I Get (blank)," replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: "I Get Knocked Down," "I Get Around," "I Get a Little Bit Genghis Khan," and/or "I Get By With a Little Help From My Friends." And yeah, I get it if you feel like these titles are all song lyrics (because they are), but there's a lot of potential here for you to get a new poem at the end of this exercise.

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Build an Audience for Your Poetry!

Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial

Learn how to find more readers for your poetry with the Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial! In this 60-minute tutorial, poets will learn how to connect with more readers online, in person, and via publication.

Poets will learn the basic definition of a platform (and why it’s important), tools for cultivating a readership, how to define goals and set priorities, how to find readers without distracting from your writing, and more!

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at an I Get Blank Poem:

“i get a little distracted”

i get a little distracted
whenever you are close
& even more attracted
when you haunt me like a ghost,

because the language we speak
isn't captured in our words
but the twitter of our beaks
as if we are two love birds.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He gets distracted more than a little bit a lot of the time.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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