Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 424

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For today’s prompt, write a sick poem. The poem could be about someone or something that is physically sick (a person with the flu or a plant with some disease). Or you can open it up to systems that are corrupted or wherever you wish to take it. Just remember, as always, poem nicely.

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Here’s my attempt at a Sick Poem:

“The Fever”

Everything was sick.
The trees were sick;
the snow was sick;
even the street lamps
projected a sick light
onto the sick gutters
and walkways of town.
Everywhere a cough
and a whisper of doom.
Each sneeze produced
an open prayer. And yet,
even in a town packed
with the plague, a boy
and a girl found a path
to fall in love before
the fever took them both.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He knows that sometimes you get the fever and other times the fever gets you.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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