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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 398

For today’s prompt, write a bug poem. My first thought was bug in the sense of an insect, but there are other meanings as well. For instance, spies may bug a room with small microphones. Or one person may bug (or annoy) another person by not touching them while just barely not touching them.

I hope this prompt doesn't cause you to bug out of here.

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Here’s my attempt at a Bug Poem:

“Bugs and Pop”

Some say they're insects, but I call them bugs;
some drink from glasses, but I prefer mugs.

You can drink your soda, but I like pop;
some bugs fly, but others prefer to hop.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He has now gone six months without soda pop, but Georgia is filled with bugs.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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