Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 389

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Yesterday, I finally released the 2016 April PAD Challenge Results. Tomorrow, I'll release the guidelines for the 2017 April PAD Challenge. But first, I know some people have been having trouble posting comments to the site. If you have (even if you've contacted me before), please contact me again at robert.brewer@fwmedia.com with information about what happens when it doesn't work for you, how many times it can take before a comment finally takes (if it even takes), and what browser you use. There's a new reporting system, and I want to get this issue front and center, but I need your help to make this happen.

For today’s prompt, write an improvement poem. It could be an improvement you'd like to see in yourself, in someone else, or in a machine, tool, or whatever else you can think to improve. (For instance, I'd like to see an improvement in how at least some folks are having to comment on this blog.)

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_Poems

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at an Improvement Poem:

“Never Ending”

i lose 20 pounds
so i can start running
& the more i run
the more i want to lose weight

& the more i want to improve
other things in my life
like my writing
which always requires more reading

& of course my kids
could always use a little more
of my time & attention
to details

& i'd like to volunteer
with the church & scouts
& the world in general
& it seems like i'm always

looking for the next way
to improve myself
& those around me
& i've given up on finding

my way to a finish line

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). And he believes in the process more than the result, whatever that means.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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