Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 386

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For today's prompt, take the phrase "Good (blank)," replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write the poem. Possible titles might include: "Good Morning," "Good Evening," "Good Bye," "Good Golly, Miss Molly," and so on. I hope you have a "good time" writing "good poems" on this "good day."

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_Poems

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Good Blank poem:

“Good but not Great”

He tells me he feels "good but not great"
when I ask him how he feels,

and I think I know how he feels,
but I'm not great at interpreting feelings,

though I am pretty good--just sometimes
I go a little too far and over analyze,

trying to do something great when
I should be content with something good

and anyway I waste a great deal of time
on these good moments with complete strangers,

which is why I'm really good about spending
most of my days reading great books

instead of getting out to have a good time
with all the people who I think are just great.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). And he's pretty good at a lot of stuff, though not super great at most things.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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