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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 347

It's kind of hard to believe, but we're about to embark on another month of poeming daily in just a couple days. Check out the 2016 April PAD Challenge guidelines here.

For today's prompt, write a preparation poem. Sure, I'm preparing for the 2016 April Poem-A-Day Challenge, but there are plenty of other events, things, and people for which to prepare. For instance, I've recently started running again and prepare myself each day for that. Or prepare to take a test, go on a date, or lead a meeting. And, of course, there's the possibility of taking it the other way: lack of preparation.

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Preparation Poem:

“Preparation”

Maybe in my youth, I did not care,
or, perhaps, I feared to ever dare,
but it's true: I had a reputation
as someone who never came prepared,

whether it was for a celebration
or some other important occasion,
you could bet I came without my fare,
and caused my share of unplanned frustration.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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