Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 339

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It's a day late, but happy Groundhog Day! The marmots in PA and GA both agree this year that we're in for an early spring. Let's hope they're right.

For this week’s prompt, write an anticipation poem. A person could anticipate an early spring or a lover's fling; a person could anticipate any old thing. Not sure why I just broke into rhyme, but some folks even anticipate crimes (that may or may not happen from time to time). So whether it's wrong or whether it's right, I anticipate the poems people are going to write.

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_Poems

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at an Anticipation poem:

“flashes in the sky”

we saw the flashes in the sky
before we heard any thunder
it was enough to catch the eye
we saw the flashes in the sky
clutching our kids to say o my
both sound & light ripped asunder
we saw the flashes in the sky
before we heard any thunder

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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