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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 324

I apologize for the late prompt today. Sometimes I have trouble coming up with a prompt; other times, I struggle with the poem. This time around, I had the prompt--and thought it was a good one--but the poem took a while to get loose.

For today's prompt, write a spectacular poem. Poems that are spectacular might be about BIG events or occurrences: Think Spectacular Spider-Man, or think about great spectacles (some good, some disastrous). Or look at the spectacular things that happen at an atomic or molecular level. Here's to a spectacular week of poeming!

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Re-create Your Poetry!

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_Poems

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

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Here’s my attempt at a Spectacular Poem:

“The Spectacular C.B.”

I've never done anything particularly
spectacular. Never won an election, kissed
the girl, or received more than rocks in my candy
bag on Halloween. I did kick that football once,

but I was invisible--so I could never
prove it at all. Maybe the most spectacular
thing about me is my lack of spectacular
attributes. I'm just a kid with a sister and

a dog and an empty mailbox (especially
around Valentine's Day) and a bag full of rocks.
When other kids see me coming, they turn around:
No one plays with the spectacular Charlie Brown.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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