Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 316

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For today's prompt, write an open poem. The poem could be about physically opening something: a garage door, a bottle of soda, or your mouth. The poem could also go the metaphorical route of opening a can of worms or Pandora's box. Or if you're into golf or tennis, writing about the U.S., French, or British Opens is permitted fine. It's all open to interpretation, I guess.

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Build an Audience for Your Poetry!

Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial

Learn how to find more readers for your poetry with the Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial! In this 60-minute tutorial, poets will learn how to connect with more readers online, in person, and via publication.

Poets will learn the basic definition of a platform (and why it’s important), tools for cultivating a readership, how to define goals and set priorities, how to find readers without distracting from your writing, and more!

Click to continue.

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Here's my attempt at an Open Poem:

"we never close"

the lights are always on
in both the night & day.
our doors will stay open
if you're willing to pay.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which means he maintains this blog, edits a couple Market Books (Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market), writes a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine, leads online education, speaks around the country on publishing and poetry, and a lot of other fun writing-related stuff.

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That said, Robert is also an introvert, which means he often has to think out what he’s going to say before he says it–so he struggles in small talk situations with strangers. And he’s the author of Solving the World’s Problems.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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