Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 301

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If you haven't seen it yet, I've started sharing the names and bios of the guest judges for the 2015 April PAD (Poem-A-Day) Challenge. I'll continue adding throughout the month. Click to continue.

For this week's prompt, write a poem inspired by a movie. Base your poem on a scene, a character, or even the plot. You can leave a clue in your poem or try to hide your tracks completely. Have fun with it.

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Learn how to self-prompt your poetry!

Creating_Poetry_Self_Prompts

Avoid running into writer's block by figuring out how to continually self-prompt poems on your own. Whether it's digging into personal memories or playing with poetic forms, there are so many ways poets can continually prompt themselves to write even when it seems there's nothing new to write.

Click to continue.

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Here's my attempt at a Movie Poem:

"I didn't mean to call you a meatloaf"

Jack, I'm serious. This transformation
in a living room beneath the blue moon
is a major bummer. It really hurts
even if I'm staying with a hot nurse

in a foreign land. Man, look at my hands
as they stretch into claws; check my teeth and
that freaking snout. O man, Jack, I want out,
but I can't take my own life. There's no doubt

I'd feel better, but who'll pull the trigger?
Because I can't. I won't. My guilt's bigger
every night, but I fight my flight. O Jack,
how I wish we could have the good times back.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer's Digest Writing Community, which means he maintains this blog, edits a couple Market Books (Poet's Market and Writer's Market), writes a poetry column for Writer's Digest magazine, leads online education, speaks around the country on publishing and poetry, and a lot of other fun writing-related stuff.

roberttwitterimage

He's married with five kids and loves watching quirky movies from the 80's. He's also the author of Solving the World's Problems.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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