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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 294

For this week's prompt, take the phrase "State of (blank)," replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then write your poem. Possible titles include: "State of the Union," "State of Ohio," "State of Grace," "State of Mind," and so on.

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Here's my attempt at a State of Blank poem:

"state of mints"

a man knocked on my door today
& asked if i was aware of the state
of mints "of course," i said, "i have
no clue" "which is why," he said,

"it is fortuitous that i arrived today
because i have a prepared state-
ment on the state of mints" "have
at it," i said "here we go," he said

& even though it happened today
i must have been in some state
of not listening because i have
forgotten everything that he said

but my breath smells minty fresh

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

roberttwitterimage

He has a small tin of ShakeSpearmints on his desk, and he's caught a little of the state of the union, and he wrote a poem today. Now, it's your turn.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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