Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 290

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For today’s prompt, write an excitement poem. Excitement can be a good thing, but excitement can often lead to very bad things. So whether you're excitement leads to good results, bad results, or mixed results, I hope you're excited to get writing today (and throughout the week).

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Here’s my attempt at an Excitement Poem:

“hands off”

when the boy gets excited, he starts to cough,
and it's not long until the girl says, hands off.
but that boy don't listen when he gets this way,
and it's not long until the cops have their say,
because the girl was the light, the boy a moth.

when a person says, hands off, it means hands off,
whether you want to get frisky, sweet, or rough,
because it's a person, not a toy to play
when the boy gets excited.

love if you will, though its restraint can be tough,
and listen when lovers say, that is enough.
a rebuke doesn't mean your lover will stray,
only your hungry hands are too much today.
so listen: hands off means hands off means hands off
even when the boy gets excited.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

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He is excited that shopping and wrapping season is almost over. Happy holidays, everyone!

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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