Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 289

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For today's prompt, write a high poem. Now, I know the word "high" is a loaded one--so take it where you may. There are high temperatures, high heights, and other meanings related to high. You can even transform high into the greeting "hi," which then leads down a whole new rabbit hole.

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Here's my attempt at a High Poem:

"high wire"

balancing is the same at 3 inches
as it is at 3 feet or 3 stories. the trick

is thinking 3 stories is 3 inches.
when i let myself, i'm still scared

of the dark. a corner conceals
a burglar or poltergeist. nothing's

different, but i let my mind wander.
falling from 3 stories is much

different than falling from 3 inches,
but balancing is the same.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

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He is not a fan of heights or the dark, though both are fine for other folks. That said, he does like to write late at night and on airplanes--maybe to channel the anxiety?

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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