Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 284

Author:
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Before we get into today's prompt, two things:

  1. I need to get a hold of Alana Sherman and Cameron Steele for their bios in the Poem Your Heart Out anthology/prompt/workbook. If you know how to contact them (or if you are them), please send me an e-mail at robert.brewer@fwcommunity.com. Thanks!
  2. Walter J. Wojtanik (a former Poetic Asides Poet Laureate and currently awesome poet) just released a collection of poems: Dead Poet... Once Removed. Click here to learn more and grab a copy of your very own.

For today's prompt, write a pick up poem. In the poem, you could write about picking stuff up--like operating a crane or cleaning a bedroom. Or it could be about picking up someone at a bar. Or picking up the pace. Or whatever else you happen to pick up...on. Have fun!

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Write a poem for a chance at $1,000!

Writer’s Digest is offering a contest strictly for poets with a top prize of $1,000, publication in Writer’s Digest magazine, and a copy of the 2015 Poet’s Market. There are cash prizes for Second ($250) and Third ($100) Prizes, as well as prizes for the Top 25 poems.

The deadline is October 31.

Click here to learn more.

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Here's my attempt at a Pick Up Poem:

"Disco Dracula"

Hey, baby, what's your blood type?
You may be type O negative,
but you look type A to me.

Sorry, I don't get out much
and when I do I have to
watch the time like Cinderella.

I do like walks in the park,
especially after dark,
but I'm not into watching

the sun rise. Or even set,
though that's usually when I get
up and do my groove thing.

Yes, burn, baby, burn, that's
why I avoid sunlight--
so that I can survive

off the village people
who hang near the YMCA
down in the funky town.

I agree; I'm a super freak
who can't get enough of
your love, babe, please

don't leave me this way.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53).

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He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

He is sometimes a little more slap happy than your typical poet and reads his poems in the voice of Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula (just because).

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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