Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 283

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For this week's prompt, write a natural poem. Some poems just come more naturally than others, and maybe you're already furiously scribbling. However, here are a few ideas for everyone else: write about the natural world (plants, animals, etc.); write about all-natural foods or diet; write about human nature or animal nature; or write about nature vs. nurture. Those are just a few ideas. Go with whatever feels natural.

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Write a poem for a chance at $1,000!

Writer’s Digest is offering a contest strictly for poets with a top prize of $1,000, publication in Writer’s Digest magazine, and a copy of the 2015 Poet’s Market. There are cash prizes for Second ($250) and Third ($100) Prizes, as well as prizes for the Top 25 poems.

The deadline is October 31.

Click here to learn more.

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Here's my attempt at a Natural Poem:

"The Natural"

When I was a boy, sports informed
everything I did. I played most
of them. Football, basketball, and
soccer, of course, but baseball was

the big one. My favorite book
was Little Lefty, and I loved
The Natural film with Robert
Redford who, as Roy Hobbs, never

used his natural talent as
a baseball player until it
was nearly too late, but he did
on the last pitch with a new bat

and he found success the right way
by doing what came natural,
and there was hope in that movie,
because I could fail as often

as I needed, but if I tried,
things would eventually turn
out right. I'm no longer a boy,
but I still believe that message,

and I don't care if people need
cars or books or a simple game
to hear it: that everyone can
find a path that feels natural.

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roberttwitterimage

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

He does not usually ramble in his poems, but when he does it feels pretty natural.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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