Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 281

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For this week's prompt, write a "next in line" poem. This could be a poem about somebody waiting in a line at the DMV or the grocery store obviously. But it could also be about a line of lovers, a line of errors, or a line of poetry. What is coming up? What is around the corner? These could be topics for a "next in line" poem.

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Writer’s Digest is offering a contest strictly for poets with a top prize of $1,000, publication in Writer’s Digest magazine, and a copy of the 2015 Poet’s Market. There are cash prizes for Second ($250) and Third ($100) Prizes, as well as prizes for the Top 25.

The early bird deadline is October 1 and costs $15 for the first poem, $10 for each additional poem. Enter as often as you’d like.

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Here's my attempt at a Next in Line Poem:

"next"

always searching, always looking, always finding, always buying,
always tweeting, always booking, always linking, always buying,
always gaming, always playing, always talking, always buying,
always driving, always flying, always riding, always buying,
always buying, always buying, always buying, always buying...

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

roberttwitterimage

He likes to buy things, sure, but there's more to life than commerce. Just saying. Robert is married to the poet Tammy Foster Brewer, who helps him keep track of their five little poets and the toys with which they play.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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