Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 278 | Write a Poem on Wednesday - Writer's Digest

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 278

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Quick note on the April Poetry Challenge results: We are just three days short of having all 30 days reported. Hopefully, we'll finish it up between now and the next prompt. Want to see who's already been listed as a winner and/or finalist? Click here to see 27 winners and 243 finalists.

For today's prompt, write a framily poem. That's not a typo. I'm thinking framily: friends and family (you know, like Sprint's framily phone plan?). Okay, it's a little silly using the word "framily," but when have I avoided silly? Write a poem that involves (or is inspired by) your friends and family. Everyone should have a good story to tell, whether it's funny, sad, serious, etc.

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2015 Poet's Market

2015 Poet's Market

Publish Your Poetry!

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Click to continue.

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Here's my attempt at a Framily Poem:

"friends & family"

we commandeered a boat when the zombies attacked
because none of them could swim & we figured we had
at least a month's worth of food & drink & we were all friends

& family so it would be kinda like a month-long party while
the land lovers & brain eaters fought it out on shore & well
it kinda was a party for the first night or three (can't recall)

to the point that we drank all the alcohol & ate the meat
& dumped a lot of the rations overboard because johnny
thought it would be a good prank & that's what we believed

until we sobered up to the reality that we'd have to dock
& draw straws for who would hunt down some grub stuck
as we were but sometimes you gotta talk & others walk

& when you see an approaching bar you best had better duck

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

roberttwitterimage

He spent Labor Day weekend in a car for more than 30 hours with three kids packed like sardines in the backseat of his tiny Kia Spectra. In other words, it was an interesting trip. In addition to driving all over the place with his family, Robert also makes slight alterations in his bio notes for these Poetic Asides posts. Honk if you read them.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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