Skip to main content

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 278

Quick note on the April Poetry Challenge results: We are just three days short of having all 30 days reported. Hopefully, we'll finish it up between now and the next prompt. Want to see who's already been listed as a winner and/or finalist? Click here to see 27 winners and 243 finalists.

For today's prompt, write a framily poem. That's not a typo. I'm thinking framily: friends and family (you know, like Sprint's framily phone plan?). Okay, it's a little silly using the word "framily," but when have I avoided silly? Write a poem that involves (or is inspired by) your friends and family. Everyone should have a good story to tell, whether it's funny, sad, serious, etc.

*****

2015 Poet's Market

2015 Poet's Market

Publish Your Poetry!

Learn how to get your poetry published with the latest (and greatest) edition of Poet’s Market. The 2015 Poet’s Market is filled with articles on the craft, business, and promotion of poetry, in addition to poet interviews and original poetry by contemporary poets.

Plus, the book is filled with hundreds of listings for poetry book publishers, chapbook publishers, magazines, journals, contests, grants, conferences, and more!

Click to continue.

*****

Here's my attempt at a Framily Poem:

"friends & family"

we commandeered a boat when the zombies attacked
because none of them could swim & we figured we had
at least a month's worth of food & drink & we were all friends

& family so it would be kinda like a month-long party while
the land lovers & brain eaters fought it out on shore & well
it kinda was a party for the first night or three (can't recall)

to the point that we drank all the alcohol & ate the meat
& dumped a lot of the rations overboard because johnny
thought it would be a good prank & that's what we believed

until we sobered up to the reality that we'd have to dock
& draw straws for who would hunt down some grub stuck
as we were but sometimes you gotta talk & others walk

& when you see an approaching bar you best had better duck

*****

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

roberttwitterimage

He spent Labor Day weekend in a car for more than 30 hours with three kids packed like sardines in the backseat of his tiny Kia Spectra. In other words, it was an interesting trip. In addition to driving all over the place with his family, Robert also makes slight alterations in his bio notes for these Poetic Asides posts. Honk if you read them.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

*****

Find more poetic goodies here:

Jeff Adams | Writer's Digest Indie Author Spotlight

Jeff Adams: Publishing Advice for Indie Authors

In this Indie Author Profile, romance novelist Jeff Adams shares his path to independent publishing and his advice for others considering that path.

Silvia Moreno-Garcia | Writer's Digest July/Aug 2022

The WD Interview: Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The bestselling author of Mexican Gothic shares her approach to world-building, character development, and what she’s learned about the business of writing in this interview from the July/August 2022 issue of Writer's Digest.

9 Pros and Cons of Writing a Newsletter

9 Pros and Cons of Writing a Newsletter

Thinking of starting your own newsletter? Let freelance writer Sian Meades-Williams lay out 9 pros and cons of writing a newsletter.

How to Write a Compelling Premise for a Thriller

How to Create a Compelling Premise for a Thriller

Learn how to create a compelling premise for a thriller or mystery novel by asking a simple question and tying it to a specific circumstance to set the stage for a thrilling read.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Make a Plan

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Make a Plan

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have your characters make a plan.

3 Tips for Writing Dystopian Young Adult Fiction

3 Tips for Writing Dystopian Young Adult Fiction

If you've ever heard it said that there's no new way to write a story, let author Julian R. Vaca tell you otherwise. Here, he shares 3 tips for writing dystopian young adult fiction to help silence our inner critics.

Rimma Onoseta: On Trusting the Process of Revision

Rimma Onoseta: On Trusting the Process of Revision

Author Rimma Onoseta discusses how seeing other Black female authors on bookshelves encouraged her to finish writing her contemporary YA novel, How You Grow Wings.

Writer's Digest September/October 2022 Cover

Writer's Digest September/October 2022 Cover Reveal

Writer's Digest is excited to announce our Sept/Oct 2022 issue featuring our Annual Literary Agent Roundup, an interview with NYT-bestselling YA horror novelist Tiffany D. Jackson, and articles about writing sinister stories.

Your Story #120

Your Story #120

Write the opening line to a story based on the photo prompt below. (One sentence only.) You can be poignant, funny, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story.