Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 271

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Before we get to the prompt this week, a few things: first, don't forget to write a golden shovel (or three) for the latest WD Poetic Form Challenge (click here for guidelines); second, Dressing Room Poetry Journal published one of my poems (click here to read it).

For this week's prompt, write a poem in which you've imagined a story for a stranger. Maybe someone you see on public transportation, a couple at the laundromat, or a neighbor. Is the person more fabulous than expected? Fallen upon harder times? Exactly as one might guess? If you need ideas, use this prompt as an excuse to do some "research" by getting out and about in the world today/this week.

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Here's my attempt at an Imagined Story Poem:

"the cashier at kroger"

as she leaves gives a high five
to the guy who collects carts

in the parking lot passing
the folks hidden in their cars

scanning their social profiles
or staring into futures

that seem impossibly bleak
but she's not interested

in the sad & lonely not
today with the sun pounding

the pavement & a little
hitch in her step & a song

on her lips & a man who
can't wait for her to return

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and the author of Solving the World’s Problems.

roberttwitterimage

His collection has recently been named an Editor’s Pick by Crab Creek Review, and includes a poem about a guy sitting in a Kroger parking lot, because apparently he spends a lot of time (and money) there.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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