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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 265

Sorry for the late prompt. It's just "that time of the year," I guess. Putting books together, reading through poems, getting ready for week-long camps with the kiddos--oh yeah, and buying a house! No braking for summer over here, but it's been fun--and I hope you're having a good summer too.

For this week's prompt, write a tribute poem, whether it's to someone living or deceased. Also, I suppose it's fine to write a tribute poem to non-humans and inanimate objects (why not?), but it should be a tribute of some sort. Some poets call these odes, I guess, but you do what you want and call it what you like.

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Here's my attempt at a Tribute Poem:

"angelou"

what goes up
must come down
unless it's filled
with helium
or propelled
by a rocket
or held aloft
by a jet stream

what goes down
doesn't have to
stay down
forever and you
clever understood
that so well
with your mines
and your wells

i'm not sad
to see you leave
because i truly
do believe
what i read
with my own eyes
you will rise
still you rise

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Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is the author of Solving the World's Problems and Senior Content Editor of the Writer's Digest Writing Community. This week's prompt was inspired by the recent loss of poet Maya Angelou, and this tribute poem pays respect to her and her fabulous poem, "Still I Rise."

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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