Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 244

Author:
Publish date:

I hope everyone had a fun and successful November of poeming. I know I did. Now, it's time to get back to our Wednesday poetic gatherings (until April's poem-a-day challenge).

For this week's prompt, write a fog poem. The poem can be about a fog. It can incorporate a fog. Or it can delve into concepts like the "fog of war" or "foggy intentions." Fog up the windows of your poetic spirit this week. Another prompt next Wednesday.

Here's my attempt at a fog poem:

"Return"

Fogs remind me of your footsteps
fading from me and how I let

you leave. The moon veils and unveils
intentions (some good, others not)

on a monthly cycle. Mirrors
scare me for what they might reveal,

doors for what they conceal. When you
leave, I have to say a quick prayer

and have faith that you will return.

*****

Master the craft of writing fiction!Learn how.

*****

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer's Digest Writing Community and a person who likes fogs, moons, and the sound of footsteps. He's not so big on mirrors and doors. He's the author of Solving the World's Problems (Press 53) and a former Poet Laureate of the Blogosphere. Robert is married to the poet Tammy Foster Brewer, who helps him keep track of their five little poets (four boys and one princess). Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

Robert Lee Brewer

*****

Find more poetic posts here:

Drawing the Line for Withholding Secrets in Young Adult and Middle-Grade Novels

Drawing the Line for Withholding Secrets in Young Adult and Middle Grade Novels

Middle-grade and young adult author Ren Koppel Torres shares the top tips for how you can keep secrets from your characters and readers.

Payal Doshi: On Letting Rejection Bring You Clarity

Payal Doshi: On Letting Rejection Bring You Clarity

Middle-grade author Payal Doshi discusses the sometimes-disheartening process of querying a novel and how she used rejection to fuel her passion for writing.

writer's digest wd presents

WD Presents: Writer’s Digest Conference Announcements and More!

This week, we’re excited to announce that our 2021 Annual Conference will be virtual, registration is open for our 2021 in-person Novel Conference, and more!

Rajani LaRocca: On Letting Your Synopsis Guide Your Writing

Rajani LaRocca: On Letting Your Synopsis Guide Your Writing

In this article, middle-grade author Rajani LaRocca discusses how the synopsis for her newest release, Much Ado About Baseball, guided her writing process.

From Script

Adding Your Personal Connection to Your Stories and Building Your Brand As a Writer (From Script)

In this week’s round up brought to us by ScriptMag.com, Script’s Editor Sadie Dean interviews Dickinson creator/showrunner/EP Alena Smith, learn how to divide and conquer as screenwriter in the business and creating fruitful relationships. Plus, a brand new Script Talk video interview with writer/director/actress Djaka Souaré about her journey as a mentor and mentee in the WOCUnite and #StartWith8Hollywood mentorship programs.

Poetic Forms

Englyn Penfyr: Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the englyn penfyr, a Welsh tercet form.

Editorial Road-Mapping: Start Your Self-Editing Process Here

Editorial Road-Mapping: Start Your Self-Editing Process Here

Editorial road-mapping begins with a challenge of willpower and ends with a battle-plan for transforming your manuscript into the book you dreamed it could be. Let editor Kris Spisak give you that map!

6 Tips for Writing a Summer Romance Novel

6 Tips for Writing a Summer Romance Novel

Summer. Three whole months of bright sunsets and glittering water and endless possibility. Here are 6 tips from romance writer Rachael Lippincott for capturing a tiny bit of that magic in the pages of your next summer romance novel.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Running Empty

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Running Empty

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, consider what happens when resources begin to run low or out.