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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 242

For this week's prompt, write a circus poem. It could be a three-ring circus, media circus, flea circus, or any other interpretation. It could be about people in the circus or those watching the circus. It could be about animals, clowns, tents, vendors, peanuts, etc.

Here's my attempt at a circus poem:

"How to Make a Clown Car"

First, you need a car--
a small one--
like a VW Beetle,
because it has to be funny,
and the smaller the funnier.

Paint the windows
and remove the interior--
even the door panels--
and strengthen the springs,
because of the weight.

But don't stop there:
Place the driver on a milk
crate and start shoving
in the clowns with their
expandable luggage,

beach balls, and spring-
loaded giraffe necks.
If you're lucky, you'll
get 15 to 20 to fit;
then, you yank them out.

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Note: I used this Car And Driver article, "The Physics Of: Clown Cars," as a reference for my poem today.

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Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer's Digest Writing Community and can't remember the last time he went to a circus--or, for that matter, what he witnessed. He's the author of Solving the World's Problems, which does include a poem about eight elephants and three clowns in Manhattan (you can use your imagination if you haven't read it yet). He's married to the poet Tammy Foster Brewer, who helps him keep track of their five little poets (four boys and one princess). Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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