Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 174

Author:
Publish date:

For this week's prompt, change the title of a book (that you may or may not like), make that the title of your poem, and then write your poem. The poem doesn't have to mirror the book. Possible titles might include: "As I Lay Crying" (instead of As I Lay Dying), "The Great Pumpkin" (instead of The Great Gatsby), or "The Fever Games" (instead of The Hunger Games).

Here's my attempt:

"The Girl With the Dragonfly Tattoo"

There's always a girl when it starts.
Though she might not have a tattoo,
she will gladly imprint your heart.
There's always a girl when it starts,
that butterfly feeling imparts
a strong desire to act cuckoo.
There's always a girl when it starts,
though a temporary tattoo.

Though she might not have a tattoo,
you still feel somewhat connected
to her as if she'd fall for you.
Though she might not have a tattoo,
you imagine dragonflies flew
across her skin, now protected.
Though just an imagined tattoo,
you still feel very connected.

*****

Connect with me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

*****

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