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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 162

Poetry relies on art as much as (or maybe even more than) craft to communicate. Sometimes, we need to look at the ugly sides of human nature to find the beauty in ourselves. Such is the case with a blog post written by poet Nin Andrews on the MNINB blog this morning: You Look Like Your Mama Mated With a Rhino.

For this week's prompt, write a poem that deals with cruelty. It can deal with bullying, name-calling, or other types of abuse. There are a million ways to be cruel, and the best way to combat cruelty is to tackle it directly.

Here's my attempt:

"million ways to be cruel"

the door that snapped shut behind me, the hand
i didn't hold when it mattered most, hugs
that didn't wrap themselves around people
who needed them, e-mail messages that
never received a response, too many
jokes not aimed at myself, the sarcastic
remarks of someone trying to deflect
the spotlight off himself, the blame shifting,
the words i wanted to say but did not.

*****

Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

Check out my other My Name Is Not Bob blog at http://robertleebrewer.blogspot.com

*****

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Great writers use dialogue to reveal the hearts and minds of their characters. In the live webinar How to Write Dialogue Like a Pro, author Elizabeth Sims teaches writers how to give characters distinctive dialogue markers, effective ways to demonstrate emotion in dialogue, why and how to break up long passages of dialogue with action, and more. Those who register for the live webinar by February 2 will also have an opportunity to receive a critique on a sample (up to 500 words) of dialogue from a work-in-progress.

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New Letters: Market Spotlight

New Letters: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at New Letters, a literary publication that seeks poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Censer vs. Censor vs. Sensor (Grammar Rules)

Censer vs. Censor vs. Sensor (Grammar Rules)

Let's look at the differences between censer, censor, and sensor with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

A Conversation About Addiction and the Family Dynamic

A Conversation About Addiction and the Family Dynamic

Authors Jessica Lahey and Lynne Reeves Griffin have an open discussion on writing complicated realities, the intersection of memoir and nonfiction, and more.

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 22

For the 2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets are tasked with writing a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write an animal poem.

writer's digest wd presents

WD Presents: 6 WDU Courses, Our Short Short Story Competition Deadline, and More!

This week, we’re excited to announce 6 WDU courses, our Short Short Story Competition accepting submissions, and more!

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 21

For the 2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets are tasked with writing a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write an ekprhastic poem.

From Script

Writing Holiday Films, Comedies, and Biopics (From Script)

In this week’s round up brought to us by Script magazine, an intimate conversation with King Richard scribe Zach Baylin about writing biopics, learn about female trailblazer Alice Burton Russell Micheaux, the pros and cons of pursing an MFA, and more!

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 20

For the 2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets are tasked with writing a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write a Blank You poem.

Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Ignoring Your Weaknesses

Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Ignoring Your Weaknesses

The Writer's Digest team has witnessed many writing mistakes over the years, so we started this series to help identify them for other writers (along with correction strategies). This week's writing mistake is ignoring your weaknesses.