Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 150

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As you might notice from my sophisticated numbering system, we're doing the 150th Wednesday Poetry Prompt today. Yay! It's amazing to think we've been writing so many poems on Wednesday for so long. Here's hoping we've got another 150 in us.

For today's prompt, write a poem that starts with someone else's line. I'm sure this poem has a specific name, but I've been having trouble finding it (if you know the name, chime in below). Anyway, here's what you do, use the line from another poet's poem as the first line of your poem; between the title of your poem and the actual poem, write "After (poet's name)." This way you give credit to the original poet and can feel free to take that line in a new direction.

Here's my attempt:

"Free Will"

-After Ira Sadoff

Someone is always dying.
He knows the end is coming,
and there's little he can do.

Another can't stop living
even as the end approaches,
because she has no choice:

The show must go on or else
every butterfly and
every hurricane with

its furious wings beating
against the threat of colder
waters finishing it all,

their work will be for nothing.
Someone is always dying;
another can't stop living.

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