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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 135

In case you missed it earlier, I'm soliciting feedback from the Poetic Asides community. So far, I've received more than 20 responses, and I hope to make my first Poetic Asides Round Up post tomorrow. Click here to learn more.

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For this week's prompt, write a "don't start that again" poem. There are many ways to take this. A person may have an annoying habit. A lover may try to steal one more kiss. A dreamer may try one more half-baked idea (that's surely doomed to failure). Of course, the act of poeming itself may be the subject for such a poem.

Here's my attempt:

"Poem"

There you go again,
getting me all nervous
that I ain't gonna have
another good thought
drop out of my head.

It's been a whole week
since you've been around,
rolling around town
with some other guy
who don't even revise.

Please come back to me,
or at least call me,
tell me it's gonna be
just like old times when
you came again and again.

This here stanza is
big enough for the two
of us, plus I found
us a rhyme or three
under the poet tree.

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Want to get metrical?
My poem above isn't perfectly metered, but you can learn how (and why) to write metrical poetry with Writing Metrical Poetry, by William Baer (currently available for less than $7). This book includes step-by-step instruction, actual poetic examples, and non-intimidating guidance.

Click here to learn more.

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