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Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 109

For this week's prompt, write an "other side of the fence" poem. It's easy to get caught up in our own worries and concerns. This poem should attempt to empathize with the other person, animal or situation. For instance, you could write a poem from the perspective of the person who did a horrible job bagging your groceries (smashing the bread) or the spider who made you gasp.

Here is my attempt:

"Biggie Burger Cashier"

After a few hours, the questions grow stale:
"Would you like fries with that?" "Want to upsize
your biggie meal?" Don't mistake my bright eyes
as interested. I just want to sell
you a burger and soda. My main goal
is to get out of here without raising
my voice or blood pressure. It's amazing
how you rush your orders as if your whole
world will end if you don't receive your meal
within one minute of sharing with me
that you would like your fries without salt
and your black coffee hot (but not too hot).
I admit I often dream I will free
myself of taking orders for these deals.

*****

Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

*****



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