Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 011

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Last year I read Ted Kooser's The Poetry Home Repair Manual (Bison Books) and was struck by how he writes every one of his poems with an audience in mind. For today's prompt I want you to pick an audience and write a poem to that audience. Put the name of your audience in the title of your poem. Your audience can be dead or alive, real or imagined, general or specific--but you must pick an audience to which you're writing.

Here's my attempt:

"Stapler"

The paperclips hold nothing
over your metal breath, the way
I can push you down and not
worry my papers will come
undone. Come time to refill
your belly, you may misfire
a staple or two, but once fed
I know where my hands go
to find their attachment. You
kerpepunk into the evening
with the determination of finding
your dreams affixed to a desk.

*****

(Of course, the above audience--in my mind--is addressed to the inanimate object, a stapler, but also to those brave people who staple day in and day out without getting their full stapling due.)

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