Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 008

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Back in the "good old days" of writing for creative writing courses in college, I found myself learning and becoming obsessed with form and structure--both in my poetry and my fiction writing. In fact, I became so enamored with form and structure that sometimes I tried forcing words into a structure without any cares about writing compelling material. My thoughts then seemed to be, "People should just appreciate the structure (of the story or poem)." Of course, that's a silly way for a writer to think. Structure without substance is just a skeleton, and skeletons are lifeless.

That said, I still do appreciate and love to play with poetic forms. If you're interested in them, I've defined several under the Poetic Forms category in the left-hand toolbar of this blog. Just click on the link and scroll down to dig for different forms.

For this week's prompt, I want you to write a shadorma. (Click here for my initial post on this specific poetic form.) This is a 6-line Spanish poem with a syllable pattern of 3/5/3/3/7/5--simple as that.

You can write your shadorma on any subject, but if you happen to need a subject, you can write your shadorma on something related to school, schooling, learning, or teaching. Something educational.

Here's my attempt for the day:

"Numbers"

Seven men
followed six women
into the
lake water
before realizing they
were one woman short.

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