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Friday SPAM poetry prompt #1109

SPAM prompt line: Singer's list

I've been trying, off and on, to write a poem to prompt #727, "I'm writing to find love." Talk about being blocked. I wrote the initial list of statements quickly enough; but I pull it out and tinker with it, then put it away again, hoping it will spark something next time. So far it hasn't. I know I'm over-thinking it and being too critical. It's just a little prompt, and all I have to do is write a little throwaway poem. Splinters are little, too, though, and they also can get stuck way deep.

So, if you have problems writing to these prompts, I know how you feel. If you don't have problems, I bow to your gung-ho ability to get things down on the page.

Anyhow, let's return to prompt #727. During my most recent attempt to create something from this prompt, song titles and phrases from song lyrics about love started running through my brain. Soon I couldn't think of anything else. Where is love? You can't hurry love. Love is a battlefield.

Love, love me do! All you need is love. Loves me like a rock. Love, don't let me be lonely. Only love can break a heart. Only love can mend it again.

This week's prompt line, "Singer's list," reminded me of my mental love song parade, and I thought this would be a good opportunity for a "found poem" exercise.

You can base your exercise on a real singer's repertoire; or you can focus on one singer's or band's songs from one CD; or you can just choose the next several songs you hear on the radio; or you can study old or current Billboard lists.

Once you've decided on the source of your "singer's list," compile a list of titles and/or lyric lines (can be a combination of the two). Don't worry about working the singer or band into it, unless you want to. Just see what you can put together from the set of songs, titles and lyrics, that you've chosen. (If you want an extra challenge, choose titles and lyrics randomly, then play with them to see what kind of poem develops.)

You can keep titles and lines or phrases from lyrics intact, or you can scramble them up. (And, no--when I try this exercise, I will notuse the love song titles and phrases I already came up with.)

Happy writing!

--Nancy

There are more prompts (and even a couple of poem responses) here.

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