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2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 3

Today's prompt comes from Joshua Gray.

Here's Joshua's prompt: Write a poem that scares you. It could be a scary movie or ghost story poem. It could be a poem about a secret in your past. It could be a poem about your worst fear. It just needs to bring up a scary/fearful/uncomfortable emotion as you write.

Robert's attempt at a scary poem:

"Attack of the Critics"

They descended upon the restaurants first
critiquing each soup and dessert. Waiters
ran for cover before they bum-rushed all
the theaters. From Shakespeare to Miller,
directors quaked with fear. And then, they
turned their attention to books, movies,
even television shows. Nothing was safe.
The critics became mothers, husbands,
and teachers. The critics criticized other
critics. Eventually, everything became
a critique of a critique of a critique.

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Thanks to Joshua for the prompt. Click here to learn more about him.

If you'd like to share a prompt, send me an e-mail at robert.brewer@fwmedia.com with the subject line: November Prompt. There are still slots available.

As far as the commenting, I realize many people are having trouble getting their comments to post the first (or twentieth) time. I apologize for this problem, and our tech team is aware of it. However, I think we've always had commenting problems during challenges--even on other blog platforms. So yeah, I'm extremely sorry if you're having problems. Even if you can't comment during the month, you are allowed to submit a chapbook manuscript for that part of the challenge (just in case you're wondering).

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Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

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Publish your poetry...

...with the Publish Your Poetry kit. This kit includes the 2013 Poet's Market, How Do I Publish My Poetry pdf, and Poetry - Formatting & Submitting Your Manuscript pdf.

Click to continue.

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