2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 19

Author:
Publish date:

Today's prompt comes from Madeline Sharples.

Here's Madeline's prompt: Write a "Wheel" poem: of fortune, ferris, bike, auto - any kind of wheel. Even a big wheel and wheeling and dealing will do.

Robert's attempt at a Wheel Poem:

"Spinning my wheels"

Yesterday, I saw my friend sitting on a bench
staring at birds, and I asked him how we was
doing. He said, "Fine. Just fine." "Just fine,"
I asked. "Yes, fine," he said. "Just swell."
"I thought you were fine," I said. "Well," he said,
"that too, but I'm really all right." "Which one
do you feel the most," I asked. "I suppose,"
he started to say and then he got distracted
by a squirrel working its way along a branch
before jumping to another branch in another
tree, and then my friend was up and walking
away from me without an explanation or
a good-bye, which was fine with me, because
I took his spot and his seat was still warm
and those birds were still darting from tree
to tree and the squirrel was still working
this way and that and there was not another
person in the park who might ask how I was.

*****

Thank you, Madeline, for the circular prompt! Click here to learn more about Madeline.

Click here if you prefer using the WD Forum thread.

*****

Follow me on Twitter @robertleebrewer

*****

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Learn more about poetic forms, poetic terms, poetic schools, and more about the history of poetry with John Drury's The Poetry Dictionary, a wonderful poetic reference for any poet's desk. In fact, my copy is always within arm's reach of where I'm sitting.

Click here to learn more.

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