Kimo: Poetic Form

Today’s form is a haiku variant, and those are always fun. So let’s take a look at the kimo!

Kimo Poems

Kimo poems are an Israeli version of haiku. Apparently, there was a need for more syllables in Hebrew. That said, most of the rules are still familiar:

  • 3 lines.
  • No rhymes.
  • 10 syllables in the first line, 7 in the second, and 6 in the third.

Also, the kimo is focused on a single frozen image (kind of like a snapshot). So it’s uncommon to have any movement happening in kimo poems.

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Here’s my attempt at a Kimo Poem:

Meeting of the Minds, by Robert Lee Brewer

His hands over his face, the father sits
facing his son, who’s hidden
underneath his blankets.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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13 thoughts on “Kimo: Poetic Form

  1. MargoL

    February’s tiresome clouds blacken
    ’tis wintry day of delight –
    longing for it to end.

    The mountain of dirty dishes in the
    kitchen sink. Always rushing –
    lost in repeated task.

  2. taylor graham

    CRYSTAL BASIN DREAMS

    Winter aspens neither quake nor shiver –
    leaves fallen under the snow,
    not even shadows move.

    At the Visitors Center they miss her –
    remembered tight-lipped grin, her
    back-in-the-saddle, gone.

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