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Reaching Your Audience

Make a reality check about the nature of your assumptions. Are these assumptions based on your past experience with an audience? Or are they based on your previous experience in personal relationships?

Hi Writers,
A lot of writing books come across my desk and I try to give most of them at least a quick read before stacking them on my bookshelves.

So I thought, instead of just hoarding these books, I'd share a tiny bit here. I'm not going to be doing book reviews, just pulling out some interesting excerpts that I think hold some writerly wisdom.

Here's an excerpt from Standing at Water's Edge: Moving Past Fear, Blocks and Pitfalls to Discover the Power of Creative Immersion by Anne Paris, PhD, on finding a rapport with your audience.

How do you fantasize about your audience? Are they hostile and critical? Appreciative and giving? Are they willing to follow you in your expression?

For effective communication of your artistic message, your audience must be considered. View the audience as a potential new relationship. Your goal is to engage the audience in a two-way experience. Listen to them and reach out to them to invite them into your artistic space. Attempt to share your immersive experience with them rather than presenting it to them. This may involve considerable feelings of vulnerability, especially if you have negative assumptions about the audience’s willingness to engage with you. Finding trust with an audience and becoming skillful at eliciting a relationship with them is perhaps one of your biggest challenges.

Keep Writing,
Maria
p.s. I'm considering a font change. What do you think about this one? Verdana: Ya! or No way!

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