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Mobisode Writing Could Put Extra Cash in Your Pocket

Looking around at the proliferation of TV shows and movies, you might not think there’s anywhere entertainment vendors could squeeze in their products. But there is—and they’re looking for writers to help. by John Scott Lewinski

Looking around at the proliferation of TV shows and movies, you might not think there’s anywhere entertainment vendors could squeeze in their products. But there is—and they’re looking for writers to help.

With the spread of video-enabled mobile phones, Video iPods and other high-resolution video devices, many companies are working with film and TV writers to create original content for the smallest screens. This content, also known as a “Mobisode” (a term trademarked by Fox Broadcasting Company) is defined as a TV episode specially made for viewing on a mobile telephone screen (because of the limits of data storage) that runs for a short time (at most three minutes). Now other studios and TV networks are eager to cash in, too.

With the medium being so new, Hollywood hasn’t come to terms with how to measure and regulate it, so commissions are limited and royalties rare. It also means that it’s not covered under the Writer’s Guild—freelancers have access to the mobisode world even if shut out of movie or TV scripts.

To try freelance mobisode writing, contact the publicity or media departments of major production companies and ask for their submission guidelines. Because these short flicks are often used for promotional purposes, they may begin in the public relations department. Any narrative script usually suffices as a writing sample alongside your résumé.

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