feelin' blue in a red state...

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...or seeing red in a blue state

Hi Writers,
On this election day, it seemed appropriate timing to make a statement about the so-called political leanings of Writer's Digest. Well, I hereby declare Writer's Digest independent and neutral territory—the Switzerland of the publishing world, if you will.

We've been getting a lot of flack recently about our "On the Edge" column, in particular, and I wanted to clarify a few things.

In the December issue we featured Alternative Fare, an article on Gay and Lesbian writing markets. We're doing, I think, a great job of providing analytical reports on publishing niche markets. In the past year we've covered markets for street lit, erotica and spiritual writing among others. These are potentially heated topics and—depending on what the topic is—we get called right wing wackos, left wing hippies, crazy liberal freaks and on, and on.

These are writing markets, pure and simple. We're not endorsing any lifestyle or religion or political party. We're not taking a stand on any particular issue. There are certainly plenty of places on the Web and on the newsstand to find political commentary. But there aren't many sources for fair, objective reporting on writing markets, and that's what we strive to bring you.

We're reporting on industry trends—sometimes these trends fall within the realm of heated political topics. You have my word that we're going out of our way to maintain fair, unbiased reporting.

If you think we cross the line into the realm of political commentary, I'd like to hear it, please leave a comment here.

Keep Writing,
Maria

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