My Adventures in San Francisco in 2008 ... - Writer's Digest

My Adventures in San Francisco in 2008 ...

This past weekend, I presented at the San Francisco Writers Conference. It was, as you probably guessed, great—and a lot of power players were there, from big-name authors (Clive Cussler, Tess Gerritsen) to numerous agents and more. I did two sessions, and sat in on a few more. There was literary agent "speed dating" and "table sessions" with acquiring editors. It seemed to be moving at a mile a minute, which is a good thing.
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This past weekend, I presented at the 2008 San Francisco Writers Conference. It was, as you probably guessed, great—and a lot of power players were there, from big-name authors (Clive Cussler, Tess Gerritsen) to numerous agents and more. I did two sessions, and sat in on a few more. There was literary agent "speed dating" and "table sessions" with acquiring editors. It seemed to be moving at a mile a minute, which is a good thing.


The hotel in Nob Hill had
quite the view. Ahhh ...

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I got to talk with lots of agents, and shared many a laugh over dinners.


Me concentrating hard before a speech.

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Being that this was my first trip to San Francisco, here are several things I learned about the city:
1. Parking there is a Manhattan-esque nightmare. Sometimes you have to park perpendicular to the street to avoid rolling down the hill. Even if you do park normally along a street, once you put the car in park, you jerk the wheel left to make your front tires sideways—again, to prevent "runaways."
2. No matter how much I was warned about how hilly the city is, it's worse. My legs hurt.
3. Hawaiian restaurants are still alive and well.
4. Oh yeah, and I discovered that an agent at the conference used to date Jim Morrison. Not a joke. Awesome.

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