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My Adventures in Los Angeles: Part I

Been long enough since I blogged? (Don't answer that.) I know—I've let you down this past week, but I was knee deep in duties concerning our writers conference out in LA in conjunction with the BookExpo America trade show.

Been long enough since I blogged? (Don't answer that.) I know—I've let you down this past week, but I was knee deep in duties concerning our writers conference out in LA in conjunction with the BookExpo America trade show.

The cheapest ticket to LA involved me getting up at 3:50 a.m. and flying out of the airport at 6 a.m. I even splurged and bought one of those horseshoe travel pillows. Flying that early did give me the opportunity to see the sunrise over the clouds and capture this snapshot:


Who says flying out at 6 a.m.
doesn't have its privileges?

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Anyway, I made it to LA safely, though I've been battling a nasty cold, and the downtown hotel we got a good deal on is kind of a dump—BUT—the good news is: The conference went very well. Nay, it went awesome. Attendance was good and the LA Convention Center was very nice. It was more hectic than last year, and I can recall three times during the day when I was in a flat sprint trying to do something. Here are some more photos from the day:


This was a panel of script managers who
shared secrets on breaking into Hollywood.
From left: Ken Sherman of Ken Sherman Associates,
Garrett Hicks of Will Entertainment, Margery
Walshaw of Evatopia, and Marc Manus of Manus Entertainment.

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Lunchtime speaker Blake Snyder kept the
crowd laughing as he spoke on "What Hollywood
Has Taught Me About Storytelling."

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I included this photo of Blake at lunchtime
so you can see how big the conference is. I'd say
the amount of attendees you see is about
60% of all that were in the room.

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The Pitch Slam, which featured agents, script managers
and editors, went very well. Here you can see
four different agents sitting down to talk with
writers and listen to ideas.

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