My Adventures at the Writer's Digest Conference 2011

I just got back from our 2011 Writer's Digest Conference in New York City, Jan. 21-23, 2011. The conference took a lot of planning and involved three days, dozens of speakers, more than 50 literary agents, more than 500 attendees, as well as God knows how many hilarious lines from panelist Janet Reid. (All photos below taken by WD managing editor Zachary Petit.)
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I just got back from our 2011 Writer's Digest Conference in New York City, Jan. 21–23, 2011. The conference took a lot of planning and involved three days, dozens of speakers, more than 50 literary agents, more than 500 attendees, as well as God knows how many hilarious lines from panelist Janet Reid. (All photos below taken by WD managing editor Zachary Petit.)

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Above: Literary agent Donald
Maass addresses the crowd

It was such a blast meeting so many cool writers, many of which I've met before. The only problem with a conference like that is I'm always fixing something or finding someone that I don't have proper time to sit down with everyone I want to see.

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Above: The Agent Pitch Slam


Plenty of people were already talking about what they learned, so you can catch snippets of conference sessions online. The best place to start is our official WD live conference blog, which was run by the ladies over at First Novels Club. Also, there was a lot of tweeting going on with our official #wdc11 hashtag. Those tweets are definitely worth a look, as well.

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Above: My book! You can see my
name real small in green

If you came to the conference, thank you so much for attending. I hope you were helped in your writing journey. If you have feedback, I'm certain there will be an avenue to reach us soon. People have been asking me if this conference will happen again, and I don't know for sure, but Jan. 2012 seems logical, especially since we beat our attendance goal with this event by 40%. Maybe I'll see you next year!

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