Follow-up: Agents Finding Your Blog Online

Author:
Publish date:

Q. Hi, Chuck! I have a question about agents and blogs: I have read and heard so many accounts of writers blogging about a specific topic or writing project, and an agent or editor reading it, contacting the writer, and offering to consider looking at a proposal, reading sample chapters, etc. (I've even read of some authors who were offered immediate representation)! I understand this is because the writer/blogger had built up a platform, had a wide audience/readership, did speaking engagements, etc. I am trying to do those promotional things with my blog as well. BUT I WONDER: Just how often do agents/editors read blogs? Is it fairy tale wishing? Thank you for shedding some reality on this for me!
- Anonymous

A. I don't know how often agents read blogs. It depends on the agent. Newer agents tend to be more proactive about a lot of things. They're reading literary journals and calling writers; they're out there LOOKING for clients who can create books and make money. Established agents not so much.
But this whole subject is a lot simpler than you think. Create a blog; build a platform; show the world something interesting and unique. An agent may never come across it and offer you representation - but that doesn't matter. If they don't come to you, you just go to them! If you're not one of the chosen few who is "offered immediate representation," then you can just create a nonfiction book proposal and SHOW them your idea and platform. Voila.
A lot of people ask about this very thing - agents "discovering" writers online through blogs and such. This happens, sure, but you can never COUNT on it happening. And frankly, I think that you have to have a SUPER popular blog and most people either have a small blog or a medium blog as opposed to a very large one.
If you're looking for an example of a huge site that turned into a book deal, look at I Can Has Cheezburger? (LOL cats). If you're looking for a decent-sized blog that was unique and attracted an agent's attention, this site called Bent Objects is genius and caught the attention of my agent, Sorche Fairbank.

April PAD Challenge

30 Poetry Prompts for the 2021 April PAD Challenge

Find all 30 poetry prompts for the 2021 April Poem-A-Day Challenge in this post.

The Problem of Solving a Mystery When You're the Prime Suspect

The Problem of Solving a Mystery When You're the Prime Suspect

Mia P. Manansala, author of Arsenic & Adobo, explains how writers can help their main character solve a mystery when they're the prime suspect.

Mistakes Writers Make: Not Using Your Spare 15 Minutes

Mistakes Writers Make: Not Using Your Spare 15 Minutes

The Writer's Digest team has witnessed many writing mistakes over the years, so we started this series to help identify them for other writers (along with correction strategies). This week's writing mistake writers make is not using your spare 15 minutes.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Unexpected Visitor

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Unexpected Visitor

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, invite an unexpected visitor into your story.

7 Tips for Writing a Near Future Dystopian Novel

7 Tips for Writing a Near-Future Dystopian Novel

In this article, debut author Christina Sweeney-Baird explains how writers can expertly craft a near-future dystopian novel.

Pam Jenoff: On Writing About Isolation While Isolated

Pam Jenoff: On Writing About Isolation While Isolated

Bestselling author Pam Jenoff shares how she explored themes of isolation in her latest novel, The Woman with the Blue Star, while writing during the 2020 pandemic lockdown.

8 Ways to Add Suspense to your Novel

8 Ways to Add Suspense to Your Novel

Authors Mark and Connor Sullivan are no strangers to utilizing suspense in their novels. Here, they share their top 8 tips for writers to do the same.

Lynn Painter: On Rom-Coms and Escapism

Lynn Painter: On Rom-Coms and Escapism

Author Lynn Painter discusses the strengths of the romantic comedy genre and how she utilized them in her novel Better than the Movies.

On Mining Humor From Family Dynamics in Your Writing

On Mining Humor From Family Dynamics in Your Writing

Humor often stems from things that are not humorous. Can you mine your family's dynamics for inspiration? Author Jesse Q. Sutanto believes you can, and gives you her top 3 tips for doing so.