Conference Spotlight: Jackson Hole Writers' Conference (June 25-28)

If you're looking for a writers conference set in a beautiful place that will get your inspiration going, look no further than the Jackson Hole Writers' Conference in Jackson Hole, WY, June 25-28, 2009.
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If you're looking for a writers conference set in a beautiful place that will get your inspiration going, look no further than the Jackson Hole Writers' Conference in Jackson Hole, WY, June 25–28, 2009.

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DETAILS

This is the 17th JHWC conference. The conference does an excellent job of bringing in faculty from all over the country, and providing different "writing tracks" to focus on areas of writing—poetry, young adult, magazine writing, fiction, nonfiction, travel writing, etc.

The conference seems something like a retreat to me, because of the beautiful location. I know that I will be arriving a day early to soak in the scenery.

WHO WILL BE THERE?

For starters, two literary agents: Neet Madan of Sterling Lord Literistic, and Susanna Einstein of LJK Literary Management. They will be available for pitches.

Besides agents, where do I start? An editor from People will be there. Authors include Julia Glass, Ravi Shankar, Terry Davis and Tony Earley. I myself will be teaching a few sessions (magazine writing and an intensive publishing workshop).

WHAT ELSE:

For a small extra fee, an attending faculty member will do a manuscript critique on your writing (screenplays, fiction, poetry—just about everything). I've been to plenty of conferences and never seen a manuscript critique fee so low so take advantage of this opportunity.

If you have the weekend free and always wanted to soak in the beautiful Mountain West, see the conference website here and I'll see you there.

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