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The Futility Review applies for a Poet's Market listing!

As I said in this post, I'm quite taken with The Futility Review. To my honor and delight, I found in my e-mail inbox a completed questionnaire from Jeffery Bahr, Managing Editor, for a Poet's Market listing in the Magazines/Journals section. I can't resist sharing this questionnaire with you (with Mr. Bahr's permission).

If The Futility Review were to appear in Poet's Market, here's exactly how it would look (minus the little icons, which I'm not sure how to transfer to our blog format):

THE FUTILITY REVIEW

Longmont CO 80501. E-mail: info@futilityreview.com. Website: www.futilityreview.com. Established 2007. Contact: Jeffery Bahr, managing director. Member: CLMP (pending).

• Highest difficulty rating on An Approximate Print Journal Ranking site (www.jefferybahr.com/Publications/PubRankings.asp).

Magazine NeedsThe Futility Review, published annually in print and online, is "dedicated to the non-publication of the finest poetry in America. All submissions are subjected to a multi-tier hierarchy of editors dedicated to treating all poets, and their works, with the same degree of empathy and discrimination." Wants "your best work only, and have a preference for guile over craft. We are particularly fond of paradelles." Does not want: "Poems must not include the words 'limn,' 'shard,' or 'numinous.'" Has "avoided publishing poems by almost every major poet." The Futility Review is digest-sized, printed on demand, saddle-stitched (catgut), with cover with "easily available artwork," includes ads. Receives about 3,000 poems/year, accepts 0%. Press run is "most often none";distributed free to the homeless. Number of unique visitors: 250/week. Single copy: free; subscription: free.

How to Submit Submit 3-5 poems at a time. Lines/poem: no restrictions. Considers simultaneous submissions; no previously published poems. ("Previously published" includes poetry posted on a public website/blog/forum as well as poetry posted on a private, password-protected forum.) Accepts e-mail (as attachment) and disk submissions; no fax submissions. Cover letter is unnecessary. "The excellence of your work will be reflected in the quality of the rejection. We also accept submissions by singing telegram." Reads submissions year round. Poems are circulated to an editorial board. Sometimes comments on rejected poems. Guidelines available by e-mail or on website. Responds in 2 weeks. No payment. Acquires first North American serial rights. Rights revert to poets upon publication.

Advice "You’ve been rejected by the rest, now get rejected by the best. We strive to maintain a very high quality of rejection notices."

NOTE: Seriously, check out An Approximate Print Journal Ranking and other great information on Jeffery Bahr's site, including those incredible Best American Poetry (or BAP) statistical breakdowns.

--Nancy

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