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Resources for submitting to literary journals

TGIF! Sooo happy it’s Friday, though I do have a class tonight. But it’s short. And I am meeting a friend for wine first. That helps.

More importantly: For those of you who are in the process of submitting to literary journals/ magazines, I wanted to share a few resources I’m finding helpful.

1.Duotrope: It’s free and lists current fiction and poetry publications. You’re able to search the database by Genre, Theme, and Length among other things. They also have a free online submission tracker, though I haven’t tried it out yet. Also, check out the deadline calendar— it lists deadlines for contests and theme based journals.

2. Zoetrope Virtual Studio: This is a great site to head to BEFORE submitting. It’s an online workshop, it’s free, and you can submit short stories to be critiqued by other readers/ writers. You must critique 5 stories before yours is submitted to be workshopped. I’ve used this site a few times and have received some solid feedback.

3.Book Fox: John Fox ranks literary journals from “ridiculously competitive” to “decently competitive.” There’s also direct links to the journals' online sites which saves time!

4.Lit Line: “A website for the independent literary community.” The site lists online journals and gives a blurb about each, explaining what their aesthetic is.

5. Literary Rejections on Display:A blog dedicated to the collection of real life rejection letters. Misery loves company, no? Actually, this site is pretty funny… I’ve read through a bunch and have felt, well, a part of something.Like I’ve said, I do not mind rejection letters. It means I am doing the work, sending it out into the world, trying. They motivate me. I remember reading On Writing,by Stephen King, and he said he collected all his rejection slips on a spike on his bedroom wall. He also attests to taking much of the advice from the rejections (when it was offered). And we all know how that story ends…

Note: I had a problem trying to link Book Fox and Lit Line, but they are easy to find. Good luck with your submissions! Have a good weekend, everyone!

“I still have no way to survive but to keep writing one more line, one more line, one more line…” -Yukio Mishima

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