Mistake 68: Not Respecting Yourself as a Writer

Author:
Publish date:

from 70 Solutions to Common Writing Mistakes by Bob Mayer, from The Writer's Digest Writing Kit

Why this is a mistake: Some people almost seem apologetic when they say they’re writers. Especially if they’re not yet published. If you don’t respect yourself as a writer, who will?

The solution:
Writing is a strange job. Most of the time we’re sitting around, staring off into space. If someone wanders by, he thinks we’re doing nothing. I’ve held several different jobs, including being an A-Team leader in the Special Forces, and I can say that writing is overall more intense than any them because it is self-generated. There really isn’t an outside pressure. The only downtime I get as a writer is when I make a decision to have down time.

Image placeholder title

Still, even after hitting the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Publishers Weekly best-sellers lists, I get sort of a blank stare when I tell people I’m a writer. They ask my name, and then comes the inevitable response: “Never heard of you.”

Many people don’t think it’s that hard to be a writer. They see a book that they can read in a couple of hours and figure it can’t have been that difficult to knock out. They don’t understand it takes a year or more of bleeding onto the page to create it.

If you write, you’re a writer. To a certain degree, being published is a matter of luck, so don’t let that get you down. Call yourself a writer and respect yourself.

What Is a Palindrome in Writing?

What Is a Palindrome in Writing?

In this post, we look at what a palindrome is when it comes to writing, including several examples of palindromes.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Set a Trap

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Set a Trap

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, it's time to set a trap.

5 Ways to Add a Refrain to Your Picture Books (and Why You Should)

5 Ways to Add a Refrain to Your Picture Books (and Why You Should)

Children's author Christine Evans shares how repetition is good for growing readers and gives you the tools to write your story's perfect refrain.

From Our Readers

Describe the First Time a Book Transported You to Another/Magical World: From Our Readers (Comment for a Chance at Publication)

This post announces our latest From Our Readers ask: Describe the First Time a Book Transported You to Another/Magical World. Comment for a chance at publication in a future issue of Writer's Digest.

About Us: How to Handle Your Story That Involves Other People

About Us: How to Handle Your Story That Involves Other People

Your story belongs to you but will involve other people. Where do your rights end and theirs begin?

Identifying Your Book's Target Audience

Identifying Your Book's Target Audience

Editor-in-chief Amy Jones navigates how to know your target audience, and how knowing will make your writing stronger.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 575

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a safe poem.

ryoji-iwata-QKHmi6ENAmk-unsplash

I Spy

Every writer needs a little inspiration once and a while. For today's prompt, someone is watching your narrator ... but there's a twist.

Brian Freeman: On "Rebooting" Another Writer's Legacy

Brian Freeman: On "Rebooting" Another Writer's Legacy

In this article, Brian Freeman, author of Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Treachery, discusses how he took up the mantle of a great series and made it his own.