Mistake 2: Not Finishing

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70 Solutions to Common Writing Mistakes by Bob Mayer from The Writer's Digest Writing Kit

Why this is a mistake: Kind of obvious, isn’t it? But starting a project is so much more interesting than slugging through the entire
thing. The middle section of any piece of writing, whether it be a novel, narrative nonfiction, a magazine article, even a short story, is almost always kind of hard to work on. The excitement of generating
the idea—the lure of the beginning, writing something new—isn’t there, and the lure of the finishing line is as far away as the shiver of the beginning.

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It’s always easy to get sidetracked by a new idea while you’re in the midst of working on something. It’s also easy for a writer to do just about anything other than write. Check e-mail, go out and walk the dog, do laundry, take a nap, research, market—anything. I’ve always said the hardest aspect of the job of being a writer is writing.

The Myers-Briggs personality test classifies people as either process oriented or result oriented. If you are a process person, you might have a problem getting to the end of a project.

The solution: Suck it up. Keep those new ideas and exciting other projects at bay. For the professional writer who is under contract this is a bit easier because you know your paycheck hangs in the balance, but even then, I know many authors who have a hell of a time bringing a project in on deadline.

For the writer who isn’t under contract this isn’t quite the case. But understand you won’t ever get that contract if you don’t finish a project.

If you are one of those people focused on the process and not the end result, figure out a system whereby you can reward yourself by getting to the end.

The bottom line is simply forcing yourself to sit down and plug away at it. Knocking out words regardless of how you feel. A one-hundred-thousand-word novel might take a year or several years, and then you just come to “The End” one day. But it takes hundreds of days to get to “The End.” As a writer you have to put in those hundreds of days.

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