2 Simple Blogging Exercises

Lessons and tips for working on specific aspects of your writing. —From WD's Writer's Workbook section
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1. INSTEAD OF STARTING A BLOG, SET UP A GUEST BLOG TOUR.One of the best marketing efforts is to be a guest blogger on a few dozen blogs the month your book comes out.

Use Technorati or Google Blog Search to find at least 20 popular blogs already in existence that you think speak to the kind of people who might be interested in your book.

Spend some time getting to know the blogs. Take note of who the owners are and comment often in the comment section. Make sure you like the atmosphere and attention the blog gets. Then write the bloggers personally. Tell them why you like their blogs and why you think you and your book would be a good fit for a guest gig. Offer to write an essay for the site, or show up for a day and do a Q&A. Or post an excerpt from your book. Ask if they’d be interested in reviewing the book or perhaps giving away a few copies to their readers.

The benefit to a tour like this is you can be involved in the blogshpere when the book comes out and then get back to writing the next book.

Click here for a free download on How to Start a Blog and Turn It Into a Book.

2. JOIN OR FORM A GROUP BLOG.Glogs, as I call them, can be a great alternative to individual blogs because you have four to seven writers all blogging and taking turns on different aspects of a single or several subjects. Each writer feels less pressure and the readers don’t get tired of the same voice or same type of post. (See thedebutanteball.com or theoutfitcollective.blogspot.com.)

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