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Blogs: Cutting words in your posts Part 3

Hi Writers,
Since there seems to be a great deal of angst surrounding my advice to try to keep your blog posts short, I'm going to do one final post on the subject and then move on to more creative, less-irritating topics.

My advice to try and keep the majority of your blog posts down to 300 words or fewer was only meant to be a general guideline—not an arbitrary rule—for day-to-day blogging. As I wrote in my original post "20 Tips for Good Blogging" if you've got good stuff—go long. But let it be a conscious decision.

If you're a blogger who's writing long posts on a regular basis and getting the readership and feedback you want, of course you should keep it up. Then get on here and tell us all how you're doing it, because we all want to know!

The fact is, if you're accustomed to writing for magazines or books, blogging is an entirely different form of writing.

Here are a few facts about writing for the web, provided by the good folks in my IT department:
• Most visitors do not scroll to see what's beyond the fold; if they do it will not be beyond 2 1/2 screens.
• People read 25% slower from screens than paper.
• Resolution of a computer screen is 30X lower than resolution of a printed page.

Just something for you to think about. Of course, if you're blogging purely as a means of self-expression and don't care about developing a big readership, don't worry about any of this.

I welcome your comments, both positive and not-so positive.

Keep Writing,
Maria

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